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Pupil Premium

What is Pupil Premium?

The Pupil Premium is an amount of money received by schools based upon the number of children at the school, eligible for Free School Meals (FSM) and Children who are looked after or children who have a parent in the Armed Forces. The Pupil Premium has a number of aims:

• to increase social mobility;

• to enable more pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds to get to the top Universities;

• to reduce the attainment gap between the highest and lowest achieving nationally.

• to improve the achievement of pupils eligible for PP by closing the gap with their peers.

Every child who leaves school without the right qualifications faces a far more difficult path to fulfilling their potential and finding employment. We owe it to all our young people to ensure they are given every chance to succeed. Sir Michael Wilshaw, Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Schools, 2012.

Hillsview Academy operates within Redcar and Cleveland, in a catchment area with high levels of disadvantage. More information about the neighbourhood in which the school is located (and in which a proportion of our pupils reside) can be found here: www.redcar-cleveland.gov/healthandpoverty


How does it work?

Simply spending more money on children does not necessarily improve their learning or their aspirations. There is no direct link between spending money and outcomes for students. If the Pupil Premium is to succeed in achieving its ambitious goals, the choices that the Academy makes in allocating the money are vital so that the funding can help raise student attainment and aspirations. The money needs to be allocated as part of a strategic approach to raising standards across the academy, providing better opportunities for our students academically, as well as developing life, work and personal skills to give them the best chance of a successful future. At Hillsview Academy we use the Pupil Premium to enable us to provide a number of different interventions and strategies. The Pupil Premium enables us to, both directly and indirectly, provide additional support and interventions for those students highlighted by the government, as needing it most.


The main barriers to educational achievement

At Hillsview Academy we have identified the following as key barriers to be addressed: low aspirations, use of academic data to quickly identify high achieving PP students, quality of teaching, especially marking and feedback. The reformed GCSEs with increased academic content have also been identified as a potential barrier for PP students due to low levels of literacy.

 

1. Summary information School

Hillsview Academy

Pupil premium grant per pupil

£935

2016 - 2017

Total PP Budget

 

Date of most recent PP Review

May 2016

Total number of pupils

748

Number of pupils eligible for PP*

399

Date for next internal review of this strategy

Jan 2017

* Figures based on January 2016 Census

 

Historical PP Funding

2015/2016

2016/2017

 

 

 

Total number of pupils eligible for PP funding

406

399

Total % of pupils eligible for PP funding

56%

53%

PP funding entitlement per FSM pupil for year

£935

£935

Total amount of PP funding received

£385,400

£373,065




How the allocation will be spent to address the barriers and why these approaches were taken

The strategies outlined above as used in 2015 – 2016 have been revised and will continue. These fall into two groups: (1) whole school approaches which affect all students, but affect PP students most strongly (for example, improving the quality of feedback) and (2) strategies which impact PP students directly (eg tracking and intervention, one-to-one support).The aim will be to combine the latest research with a clear understanding of what works at Hillsview Academy.

These approaches have been adopted based on national research (primarily the Sutton Trust and Education Endowment Foundation research) and identifying needs based on rigorous self-evaluation.

 

Specific areas of priority for disadvantaged students:

·       Progress 8 for disadvantaged pupils with high attainment upon entry was -1.44 This fell short of the achievements of ‘other’ pupils nationally (0.07) by 1.51

Attainment 8 for disadvantaged pupils with high attainment upon entry was 48.12. This fell short of the achievements of ‘other’ pupils nationally (65.00) by 16.88

 

·       Improve progress and outcomes in English for all pupils with a particular focus on ‘disadvantaged’ with high prior attainment

Progress 8 for disadvantaged pupils with high attainment upon entry in English was -1.94 This fell short of the achievements of ‘other’ pupils nationally (0.05) by 1.99

Attainment 8 for disadvantaged pupils with high attainment upon entry in English was 4.41 This fell short of the achievements of ‘other’ pupils nationally (13.10) by8.69

 

·       Improve progress and outcomes in maths for those pupils with high prior attainment who are ‘disadvantaged’

Progress 8 for disadvantaged pupils with high attainment upon entry in maths was -1.43 This fell short of the achievements of ‘other’ pupils nationally (0.06) by 1.49

Attainment 8 for disadvantaged pupils with high attainment upon entry in maths was 4.88  This fell short of the achievements of ‘other’ pupils nationally (13.14) by 8.26

 

 

 Improve progress in Science for pupils with high attainment who are ‘disadvantaged’.

 Improve progress in Humanities subjects for pupils with high prior attainment who are ‘disadvantaged’.


Headline attainment figures for micro-populations, even those making excellent progress such as:

·       Mat/Hat Boys

·       SEND pupils with statement or EHC Plan.


YEAR 11 COHORT 2015 - 2016

National figures for 2015/2016 for Non-PP

HVA pupils eligible for PP

Difference from National Non-PP

% achieving 5 A* - C in Basics (English/Maths)

64%

25%

39%

Progress 8 English breakdown

- 0.35

- 1.25

0.90

Progress 8 Maths breakdown

0.48

- 1.38

1.86

Progress 8 score average

0.15

National PP

- 0.38

- 1.4

1.93/ 1.55

Attainment 8 score average

52.56

National PP

- 41.1

29.21

64.45/ 23.35

Attendance

95.7%

86.5%

             9.2%

% achieving expected progress in English

75%

46%

            29%

% achieving more than expected progress in English

32%

15.5%

            16.5%

% achieving expected progress in Maths

71%

30%

            41%

% achieving more than expected progress in Maths

29%

2.5%

           26.5%

 



What is the most effective way to support disadvantaged pupils’ achievement?


The NFER research found that schools which are more successful in promoting high attainment amongst disadvantaged pupils have a number of things in common

Supporting the attainment of disadvantaged pupils


It identified seven building blocks of success:

 

3. Barriers to Attainment for PP Students

A

Quality of teaching, especially marking and feedback.

B

Lower levels of literacy than peers, particularly in reading and writing formal academic language.  The reformed GCSE presents increasing challenges regarding low levels of literacy to access high grades.

C

Lower levels of aspiration and engagement with school leading to higher numbers of sanctions and less participation in school life.

D

Lower attendance.

E

Social-emotional issues, which affect both attendance and behaviour.

 

 

4. Allocation of PP Funding for 2016 - 2017

 

ELIGIBLE PUPILS

FUNDING

Pupil Premium funding per pupil (£935pp)

399

£373,065

Plus LAC (£1900pp)

2

£3800

Year 7 Catch Up Funding

23

£11500

Total funding allocated

424

£388,365

 

5.  Planned Expenditure - Leadership and Management – to ensure effective leadership and management of disadvantaged funding

TYPE OF SUPPORT

DESCRIPTION

COST THIS YEAR

WHAT IS THE EVIDENCE AND RATIONALE FOR THIS CHOICE?

BARRIER ADDRESSED

SLT Lead - Disadvantaged

Member of SLT is accountable for performance of disadvantaged students, and holds departments and staff to account.

 £20,000

The DFE stated that clear responsive leadership is  a key building block for success in promoting high attainment of disadvantaged students. The SLT Lead for disadvantaged students is responsible for PP and ensures that disadvantaged students are monitored across the whole school and that every member of staff is held to account for students’ progress.

ABCDE

SLT Lead –

Assessment

Member of SLT accountable for assessment ensures that departments and staff are informed of progress and attainment of disadvantaged cohort , and held to account.

£10,000

The DFE found that more successful schools use data to identify disadvantaged students learning needs at every opportunity, by reviewing progress regularly , analysing for underperformance and engaging staff with the data to improve teaching and learning.

ABCDE

SLT Lead Behaviour and Inclusion

Member of SLT accountable for the behaviour , attendance and inclusion of disadvantaged students.

£10,000

Addressing behaviour and attendance is a key NFER building block. Success with disadvantaged students requires effective behaviour strategies : communicating , simple, clear rules and training for staff. The EEF suggests that behaviour interventions can produce 4+ months of additional progress with a decrease in problematic behaviours.

ABCDE

 

Teaching, Learning and Assessment/Outcomes – to ensure teaching meets the needs of disadvantaged pupils across the Academy and to improve outcomes for disadvantaged pupils

TYPE OF SUPPORT

DESCRIPTION

COST THIS YEAR

WHAT IS THE EVIDENCE AND RATIONALE FOR THIS CHOICE?

BARRIER ADDRESSED

Staff CPD and INSET

 

Ongoing CPD to improve T&L to ensure Quality First Teaching is good or better

£15,000

QFT is one of the most important factors in the success of disadvantaged students. The DFE found that the most successful school for attainment of disadvantaged students often focused on improvements to the quality of teaching.

ABCD

Learning Support Staff

Teaching assistants to support SEN students

£36,000

TA’s provide support for individual students with SEN or small groups of SEN students , as well as in class. Evidence suggests that TA can lead to improvements in student’s attitudes. Whilst in-class support provides less of an impact on the progress of students (1 mnth) research which focuses on TA’s who provide 1:1 shows a stronger benefit of 3-5mnths additional progress.

ABCE

KS3 /KS4 Intervention Groups

3 Tutors heading a maths /English intervention strategy for targeted students for PP students at risk of underachieving

£35,500

3 Intervention teachers work with disadvantaged KS3 and 4 students in small groups.

ABC

Saturday School and Holiday Revision

Holiday sessions for targeted Y11 students to support their progress

£16,000

Targeted sessions for disadvantaged students and during holidays , providing structured intervention in core subjects , to ensure students are making accelerated progress. EEF toolkit shows that , on av additional lesson time outside of school provides 2+ additional mnths of progress a yr.

ABC

Educational Visits

Subsidised for PP students for educational trips and visits

£5000

This allows the school to support disadvantaged students and ensure that they are able to attend any school educational trip outside the classroom. NFER found that educational visits were often memorable and learning could stay with the students in the long term, helping students develop knowledge and skills.

ABCE

 

Personal development, behaviour and welfare – to ensure that engagement is enhanced and wide-ranging opportunities given

TYPE OF SUPPORT

DESCRIPTION

COST THIS YEAR

WHAT IS THE EVIDENCE AND RATIONALE FOR THIS CHOICE?

BARRIER ADDRESSED

Student Support Managers

Team of non-specialist teaching staff who oversee pastoral , behaviour and attendance in each year group.

£100,000

Addressing behaviour and attendance is a key NFER building block. Success with disadvantaged students requires effective strategies. The EEF suggests that behaviour intervention can produce 4+ months of additional progress with a decrease in problem behaviour.

CDE

Family Focus Sessions

 

Evening or weekend sessions for targeted “Hard to reach” families to break down barriers and build confidence and aspirations around their child’s education.

£6000

EEF toolkit shows that parental involvement in school showed positive benefits on academic learning and wider outcomes such as self –confidence.

ACDE

Careers Education

Careers information advice and guidance to raise aspirations.

£9,000

The DFE found that a wide range of socio-economic factors results in disadvantaged students being 5 times less likely to enter university than their more advantaged peers. The DFE also recommends that employ specialist knowledgeable staff with specific responsibility for university access , building relationships and visits with universities.

ACDE

Attendance Officers

A team of attendance officers trained in educational welfare

£30,000

DFE found that with regards to attendance of disadvantaged students , the more successful schools set up rapid response systems to address poor attendance , including staff contacting home immediately if a student fails to arrive on time , and working with the families to address any barriers they face in getting their child to school.

DE

The Bridge – Breakfast Club Provision and staffing

On –site learning facility for our most vulnerable students who are initially disengaged with their learning.

£81,000

Targeted behaviour interventions and academic tuition in small groups for students diagnosed or at-risk of emotional or behavioural disorders, who are struggling in mainstream classes. EEF toolkit shows on av both types of intervention provide 4 additional months of progress.

BCDE

  

SECTOR

SPEND

Leadership and Management

£40,000

Teaching, Learning and Assessment/Outcomes

£107,000

Personal Development, Behaviour and Welfare

£226,000

Total Expenditure

£373,000

Total Funding Allocated

£373,065

Overspend required

£0


The following is the planned expenditure for the academic year 2016-17. For each form of expenditure, the cost and rationale is presented, as well as the actual barrier that this expenditure is addressing. If there is research evidence available (namely from the Education Endowment Fund), then the evidence column will be shaded green, with darker colours showing a large number of months of additional progress, and lighter colours showing a lower number of months of additional progress. Where the evidence column shows no colour, this means that there is no specific educational research, although there may still be recommendations from official or educational bodies (DfE, NFER, etc).


We also receive a smaller sum of money to support Year 7 students who did not achieve the expected standard in reading and/or maths at the end of Key Stage 2.
We received £12,693 in total for the academic year 2016-17.
The money was spent on a specialist teacher for a small nurture group based on the primary model.
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Web Admin,
17 Nov 2015, 02:27
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